Reflecting On 2018

There’s no denying that 2019 is upon us. Since we are still within the first two weeks of the new year, many of us are still riding the momentum of how we want this year to be different for the better. Nonetheless, before it is too late, I encourage you to take one more opportunity to reflect on 2018.

An organized inventory of what occurred during 2018 will help you to better formalize, strategize, refine, and execute your goals and aspirations for 2019. 

Here is how I recommend doing so: List content under each of the following categories (there can be overlap between the lists but, for the most part, try to keep the content in each list unique to the category of that list).

  • What did you accomplish during 2018?
  • What did you experience in 2018 that was noteworthy?
  • What occurred in 2018 that you are grateful for? 
  • What did you experience in 2018 that you enjoyed immensely? 

Purpose Is A Performance Enhancer

In his book “Conscious Coaching”, Brett Bartholomew writes that PURPOSE IS A PERFORMANCE ENHANCER, and I love the succinctness of that statement.  There is a lot of buzz nowadays about knowing what your “why” is, and, in my opinion, similar to the buzz surrounding mindfulness, any buzz around getting clear about why you do what you

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Injury/Pain Keeping You Down?

I am using today’s blog post to address and facilitate further ideation on the topic of injury/pain management.  Personally, I have had a long history with chronic pain/illness that manifests both physically and psychologically. In my experience, that which is chronic can become so debilitating primarily because what is causing the symptoms is multi-factorial/elusive and,

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Emotions VS Feelings

Two weeks ago, I wrote about the importance of being equipped with the mental models and psychological vernacular that help you to more  objectively discern what you are experiencing and why. Remember, “if you can name it, you can tame it”. Specifically, in my last post, I wrote about distinguishing the difference between stress and pressure,

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